The Jack the Ripper Tour

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Cloaked in the night, with the moonlight as his guide, Jack the Ripper haunted the streets of London’s East End in 1888, and his grisly tale of woe and murder remains shrouded in mystery to this very day. Left with rumours and crucial knowledge regarding the killings themselves, Ripperologists around the world are entering a dark world of suspense, probing the deceased mind of one of the world’s most notorious criminals.

Now YOU have the chance to be led into a world of gruesome murder and separate fact from fiction, to deduce who you think the Ripper really was, on one of our Jack the Ripper tours.

Our team of Ripperologists resurrect the East End in all its former terror with their expertise and theatrics, providing you with a frighteningly good performance and tour.

As we shock you along the way, we will revisit the deathbeds of the Ripper’s main victims, known as the canonical five, and more, and you will walk away a true expert on the case. Our Ripper tour is the most exhilarating guided walk, and almost sure to channel your inner detective, as well as raise goose-bumps from beneath the surface of your skin… are you ready for the Jack the Ripper tour?

“As advised by Martin Fido, the worlds foremost expert on Jack the Ripper”

Look for the H Division – Crime Club Logo. Beware of copycats!

What you will see

Osborne Street (Scene of murder of Emma Smith)

On 3rd April 1888, Jack the Ripper began his infamous reign of terror on Osbourne Street. The malicious nature of her death is more than significant in the Ripper’s case, as you will see with the following killings.

Osborne Street (Scene of murder of Emma Smith)

Gunthorpe Street (Scene of murder of Martha Tabram)

Argued by experts to be the first ever Jack the Ripper victim, Martha Tabram’s murder is said to have marked the dawn of a faceless killer. The cobbled streets remain intact and an eerie air of mystery drifts over this slice of the East End, sparking flashbacks to gas-lit ways and shadowed corners.

 Gunthorpe Street (Scene of murder Martha Tabram)

Frying Pan Pub (the death of Mary Ann Nichols)

Victorian London was weighed with vices, with many battling to survive the awful living conditions. The Frying Pan Pub gifted an insight into the state of the East End at this time, and also the brutal murder of Mary Ann Nichols. Last spotted in this location; the Ripper claimed another victim, but it didn’t stop there.

Frying Pan Pub (the death of Mary Ann Nichols)

Hanbury Street (Scene of murder of Annie Chapman)

Horrifically mutilated, the corpse of Annie Chapman was found on Hanbury Street on 8th September 1888. The nature of the killing was arguably a clue in itself, but, if that’s the case, what do we know about Jack the Ripper now?

Hanbury Street (Scene of murder of Annie Chapman)

The Ripper Letters

The Ripper’s identity partially shone through the letters received by the police force in 1888. But were they hoaxes? And did they burn a hole in the police’s list of potential suspects when they obtained half a kidney, suspected to be from one the victims brutally murdered by the killer?

 

The Ripper Letters

Wilkes Street

Be prepared to pop your detective specs on as we follow the trail of the Ripper on Wilkes Street and locations surrounding this significant area. The street itself breathes an air of 19th-century horror and conjures up a picture of a time of terror, a time where Jack the Ripper hunted his next victim.

 

Wilkes Street

The Death of Elizabeth Stride

At 1:00am on 30th September 1888, Elizabeth Stride’s corpse was discovered near Berner Street. That fateful night is now notoriously known as ‘the double event’, thanks to the trail left behind by the killer himself.

 

The Death of Elizabeth Stride

Ten Bells and Christ Church

Ten Bells and Christ Church are just two of the most iconic settings in the whole Jack the Ripper case. Whilst the murder sites are still significant, this location is believed to be where the victims enjoyed their evenings. It also made an appearance in the renowned film From Hell.

 

Ten Bells and Christ Church

Mitre Square (Scene of murder of Catherine Eddowes)

On the same night as Elizabeth Stride’s death, the Ripper was believed to have struck again, with the death of Catherine Eddowes. This, however, was not the end of Jack the Ripper’s infamous crimes, as his violent ways were to claim one more victim…

Mitre Square (Scene of murder of Catherine Eddowes)

Goulston Street (scene of perhaps the most vital clue in the Ripper case)

On 30th September 1888, Jack the Ripper’s cunning ways were to be thwarted by a crucial clue left behind. Would this clue help solve the mystery though?

Goulston Street (scene of perhaps the most vital clue in the Ripper case)

Dorset Street (Scene of murder Mary Kelly)

9th November 1888 marked the final death, of what is believed to be the Ripper’s last victim, Mary Kelly. Though all of the murders were savage, the nature of Mary Kelly’s death was perhaps the most brutal of them all. As we explore the site, we learn more about the killer and his murders, including all the gruesome details along the way.

Dorset Street (Scene of murder Mary Kelly)

Who was Jack the Ripper?

Following a visit to the murder sites, and iconic locations in the Ripper tour, utilising modern profiling techniques and advanced mapping, we will unveil the man that police at the time -and Rippologists today – should have been hunting for.

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JOIN OUR JACK THE RIPPER TOUR NOW - £12.50 PER PERSON

Tours everyday 2:30pm and 7:30pm from Exit 3, Aldgate East Station. Click for secure payment
BOOK TICKETS ONLINE